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Smoke Alarms and Carbon Monoxide Alarms

Smoke Alarms

In Oregon, no person may sell a dwelling unless there is installed in the dwelling unit an approved smoke detector or smoke alarm installed in accordance with the rules of the State Fire Marshall. Because of this state law requirement, most residential real estate sale forms contain a representation by the seller that, at the earlier of possession or closing date, the dwelling will have an operating smoke detector as required by law. In Oregon, battery-powered ionization smoke alarms (the most common type) must have a 10-year battery and a “hush” mechanism which allows a person to temporarily disengage the alarm. All dwellings must have the proper type, number and placement of alarms as required by the building codes at the time the dwelling was constructed but not less than one alarm adjacent to each sleeping area and at least one alarm on each level of the dwelling. (Additional rules apply to rented property.) For information about smoke alarm and detector requirements in Oregon, you should visit the State Fire Marshall’s web site at: http://arcweb.sos.state.or.us/pages/rules/oars_800/oar_837/837_045.html. Real estate licensees are not trained in building code compliance, therefore, if there is doubt about whether a smoke alarm or detector system complies with building and fire code requirements, a licensed home inspector, or the home alarm or detector company that installed the system, should be able assist you. Your real estate agent may be able to assist you in finding the right code compliance professional.

Carbon Monoxide Alarms
Effective April, 2011 any person transferring a one or two family dwelling or multifamily housing (additional rules apply to rental property) that contains a carbon monoxide source (heater, fireplace, appliance, or cooking stove that uses coal, kerosene, petroleum products, wood or other fossil fuels that emit carbon monoxide as a by-product of combustion, or has an attached garage with an opening that communicates directly with a living space) must provide a properly functioning carbon monoxide alarm(s) installed at the location(s) that provide carbon monoxide detection for all sleeping areas of the dwelling or housing. The alarm(s) must be installed in accordance with the rules of the State Fire Marshall and in accordance with any applicable requirements of the state building code. Information about carbon monoxide alarms and detector requirements in Oregon can be found on the State Fire Marshal’s web site at: http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/CommEd_CO_Program.shtml

A purchaser or transferee who is aggrieved by a violation of this requirement may bring an individual action in an appropriate court to recover the greater of actual damages or $250 per residential unit (plus fees, including attorney’s fees). Violation of this requirement does not invalidate any sale or transfer of possession. Actions for violations must be brought within one (1) year of the sale or transfer of possession.

Because of this state law requirement, most residential real estate forms will contain a representation that, at the earlier of possession or closing date, the dwelling will have an operating carbon monoxide detector as required by law. Sellers should anticipate the carbon monoxide alarm requirement as it is also included on the new seller’s property disclosure form.
Real estate licensees are not trained in building code or fire code compliance. If there is any doubt about whether a carbon monoxide alarm complies with the building or fire code requirements, a licensed home inspector, or the alarm company should be contacted.